This Holiday Season Some Dream of a White Christmas. The Accelerated Cure Project Dreams of Developing a Cure for Multiple Sclerosis

For Immediate Release
 
For more information contact:
Trish Gannon
Feinstein Kean Healthcare
617-761-6774
 
This Holiday Season Some Dream of a White Christmas
The Accelerated Cure Project Dreams of Developing a Cure for Multiple Sclerosis
 
(Waltham, Massachusetts) -- December 17, 2007 Art Mellor is one of more than 400,000 people in the U.S. and 2 million worldwide suffering from Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Its, a debilitating disease that causes paralysis, blindness, incontinence and cognitive dysfunction among other symptoms. So its no wonder that Mellor, the founder of the Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis, is less interested in snow and more interested in raising the funds he needs to scratch "Develop a cure for MS" off his holiday to-do list.
 
Researchers who study Multiple Sclerosis have many theories about what causes it. Some believe its the environment, some think its genetic, others think its viral. Mellor, who was diagnosed with MS seven years ago, believes its a combination of factors, and most researchers agree that MS is indeed multifactorial. Thats why his organization, the Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis, a national nonprofit organization based in Waltham, Massachusetts, is offering researchers around the country a unique opportunity to unlock the combination.
 
The Accelerated Cure Project for MS is in the midst of a campaign to raise several million dollars to build and maintain the largest bio sample and data bank for Multiple Sclerosis (and other demyelinating diseases) research. Blood samples from the biobank will be provided to MS researchers at almost no cost as long as they share their results with the Accelerated Cure Project. In return, Mellors team will provide a continually updated data bank called the "Cure Map" that will correlate results from different research perspectives and highlight interactions between factors that can lead to the development of MS.
 
A Faster Route to the Cure
 
When Mellor was diagnosed with MS, he did what many people in his situation do; try to learn as much as possible about this mysterious disease. What he learned however wasnt encouraging. In studying the available literature on MS research he was disappointed to discover that most results were considered to be inconclusive because of the limited number of samples used in the research. Equally discouraging was his discovery that there was no mechanism in place that would enable researchers in different fields to cross-correlate the results of their findings
 
"As an engineer by training, it seemed clear to me that if youre looking at a disease that is caused by a combination of factors, we could expedite finding that combination by studying each factor using a common set of samples and then correlating the results," says Mellor.
 
To overcome the barrier of limited sample size, his organization is dedicated to collecting thousands of samples and making them available to researchers. To help connect the dots in the complex pattern of research results, his organization has created an interdisciplinary database that will help researchers uncover the most promising directions for future study, and thereby accelerate the cure by uncovering the causes.
 
According to Dr. Benjamin Greenberg, an Assistant Professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine for the Department of Neurology, "This is the most comprehensive approach to MS research to date. If this works, we might not only have a model for curing MS, but other multifactorial diseases."
 
A hypothetical example might involve a geneticist who wants to look for unique genetic markers that may predispose people the develop MS and a virologist who is looking for evidence of past infections as potential triggers for MS. The Accelerated Cure Project would provide a common set of samples from people with MS to each researcher and enter the results of their research into their database. Then they would use sophisticated data analysis techniques to search for patterns - such as a set of genes that coincide with a particular virus. Over time, discovery of patterns such as this would help to eliminate some potential causes and implicate others.
 
Building The Repository
 
Recognizing that researchers dont have the time or resources to collect enough samples that could be used in multiple studies, Mellor has made building the repository a top priority. And Mellor is not alone in his efforts. The following research centers across the country have joined Accelerated Cure Project as collection sites for the repository: Johns Hopkins Medical Center (Baltimore), University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center (Worcester), University of Texas Southwestern (Dallas), Multiple Sclerosis Research Center of New York (New York), Barrow Neurological Institute (Phoenix) and Shepherd Center (Atlanta).
 
Currently the repository is rapidly approaching its initial goal of 1,000 samples. The Accelerated Cure Project intends to continue collecting samples from as many as 10,000 subjects for its MS Repository. The repository is projected to become the largest openly accessible, multi-disciplinary collection of bio-samples, and related donor data ever assembled for use in Multiple Sclerosis research.
 
"What we need now more than anything are the funds to continue building our repository so that we can then accelerate the cure for Multiple Sclerosis by determining its causes," says Mellor.
 
And this is Mellors only wish for the holiday season.
 
For more information about the Accelerated Cure Project or to make a corporate or individual donation, call 781/487-0008 or visit acceleratedcure.org. Checks may be made payable to the Accelerated Cure Project, 300 Fifth Avenue Waltham, MA 02451. All donations are tax deductible.
 
About Accelerated Cure Project
 
Accelerated Cure Project for MS (ACP) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis (MS) by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes and mechanisms. We provide biomedical researchers with resources that catalyze open scientific collaboration and enable them to explore their novel research ideas rapidly and cost-efficiently. ACP’s strategic initiatives include the Multiple Sclerosis Discovery Forum and the ACP Repository, a large-scale collection of highly-characterized biosamples available to scientists at any organization conducting research that contributes to our mission. All results generated through analysis of Repository samples and data are contributed back to the ACP Repository Database, resulting in an increasingly valuable and comprehensive information resource that can be analyzed to reveal new insights about MS. To date, ACP has enrolled almost 3,000 participants into the Repository through a network of 10 MS clinical centers across the United States. The samples provided by people with MS and related disorders have supported more than 60 research studies worldwide and generated more than 150 million returned data points.
 
For more information about the Accelerated Cure Project or to make a corporate or individual donation, visit http://wwww.acceleratedcure.org, or send an email to info@acceleratedcure.org.
 
About Multiple Sclerosis
 
Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that often results in severe disability including the inability to walk, blindness, cognitive dysfunction, extreme fatigue, and other serious symptoms. MS affects more than 400,000 people in the US and two million individuals worldwide. The disorder occurs twice as often in women as in men. What causes MS is undetermined and no cure has yet been developed.