Boston Cure Project For MS Hosts Free Event: Features Jonathan Katz Of Hit Series 'Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist'

For Immediate Release

For more information contact:
Belinda Vandervoort, belinda@bostoncure.org, 781-235-2882
Krista Milne, krista.milne@comcast.net, 617/969-0770
Art Mellor, art@bostoncure.org, 781/487-0008

BOSTON CURE PROJECT FOR MS HOSTS FREE EVENT: FEATURES JONATHAN KATZ OF HIT SERIES 'DR. KATZ: PROFESSIONAL THERAPIST'

Waltham, MA -- October 25, 2002 -- The Boston Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis today announced its Second Annual Event for Multiple Sclerosis on November 23 from 7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. at the MIT Faculty Club in Cambridge, Mass. This year's party features Jonathan Katz, an accomplished standup comic, musician, actor, and writerwho is especially well-known as the co-creator and star of Comedy Central's animated hit series 'Dr. Katz: Professional Therapist'. Also featured are Boston Cure Project co-founders, Dr. Tim Vartanian and Art Mellor. Dr. Vartanian will outline plans for the Boston Cure Tissue Bank and Mr. Mellor will provide progress on the organization's mission. In a pre-event lecture, Dr. Peter Lansbury will present high throughput drug discovery methods and how it might be applied to MS.

Interested participants in the event and in Dr. Lansbury's lecture can register via www.bostoncure.org/rsvp or 781/788-0880. The event is free of charge thanks to generous sponsorships from Biogen, Inc. (NASDAQ: BGEN), Serono, Inc. (NYSE: SRA), Berlex Laboratories (NYSE: SHR) and Clockwork Design Group, Inc.

Complete Agenda

6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m: Pre-event Lecture Dr. Peter Lansbury, of the Center for Neurologic Diseases, Brigham and Young Women's Hospital in Boston, will discuss his research into high-throughput drug discovery methods. Registration is required as space is limited.

7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.: The Party Begins (with heavy hors devours, sodas, and a cash bar available) and includes the talents of Massachusetts resident Jonathan Katz.

The event also features a presentation from Dr. Tim Vartanian, Boston Cure Project Co-founder and Director of the Center for MS at Beth Israel. Dr. Vartanian will share the organization's plans to establish a Multiple Sclerosis Tissue Bank, which will serve as a vital tool for future research on the disease.

Art Mellor, the Co-founder and CEO of the Boston Cure Project will give attendees an overview of the Boston Cure Project's noteworthy accomplishments this year.

Mr. Mellor said, 'We're extremely pleased with this year's powerful agenda and we're grateful to have the talented Mr. Katz join us. With this event, Boston Cure Project hopes to draw attendees interested in helping efforts to find the cause(s) of Multiple Sclerosis that lead to a cure.'

About The Boston Cure Project

The Boston Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis, www.bostoncure.org, is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to curing Multiple Sclerosis (MS) by determining its causes. Boston Cure Project believes this effort can be accelerated by organizing the research process and encouraging collaboration between research organizations and clinicians. A "Cure Map" is currently being developed by the Boston Cure Project to establish what is known and what is not known about the causes of MS. From the Cure Map, Boston Cure Project will facilitate research most likely to reveal the causes of MS in the shortest time through a large-scale, multidisciplinary, MS Repository. For more information about the Boston Cure Project or to make a corporate or individual donation, call 781/487-0008, visit bostoncure.org, or send an email to info-web0706@bostoncure.org.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that often results in severe disability including the inability to walk, blindness, cognitive dysfunction, extreme fatigue and other serious symptoms. MS affects over 400,000 people in the US and 2 million individuals worldwide. The disorder occurs twice as often in women as in men. The cause is not known and there is no known cure.